How can i calculate the length of curve?

88 views (last 30 days)
Hi,
I have a curve which includes X (meter) and Y (meter) data. Is there any way to obtain the length of curve easily?
Thanks a lot,
X=[96.0741000000000,97.1940000000000,98.3139000000000,99.4338000000000,100.553700000000,101.673600000000,102.793500000000,103.913400000000,105.033300000000,106.153200000000,107.273100000000,108.393000000000,109.512900000000,110.632800000000,111.752700000000,112.872600000000,113.992500000000,115.112400000000,116.232300000000]
X = 1×19
96.0741 97.1940 98.3139 99.4338 100.5537 101.6736 102.7935 103.9134 105.0333 106.1532 107.2731 108.3930 109.5129 110.6328 111.7527 112.8726 113.9925 115.1124 116.2323
Y=[-4.13836296940031,-4.10455468315876,-4.05645426203322,-3.99617782198545,-3.92344322326347,-3.83385191481492,-3.73582865974161,-3.61740402741020,-3.49399064332423,-3.35231953224592,-3.20552503148528,-3.04892626846560,-2.88658570885772,-2.72091440408539,-2.55226630046971,-2.38425597793465,-2.21787687713447,-2.05656258174384,-1.89889800700337]
Y = 1×19
-4.1384 -4.1046 -4.0565 -3.9962 -3.9234 -3.8339 -3.7358 -3.6174 -3.4940 -3.3523 -3.2055 -3.0489 -2.8866 -2.7209 -2.5523 -2.3843 -2.2179 -2.0566 -1.8989

Accepted Answer

Star Strider
Star Strider on 26 Aug 2022
Possibly —
X=[96.0741000000000,97.1940000000000,98.3139000000000,99.4338000000000,100.553700000000,101.673600000000,102.793500000000,103.913400000000,105.033300000000,106.153200000000,107.273100000000,108.393000000000,109.512900000000,110.632800000000,111.752700000000,112.872600000000,113.992500000000,115.112400000000,116.232300000000];
Y=[-4.13836296940031,-4.10455468315876,-4.05645426203322,-3.99617782198545,-3.92344322326347,-3.83385191481492,-3.73582865974161,-3.61740402741020,-3.49399064332423,-3.35231953224592,-3.20552503148528,-3.04892626846560,-2.88658570885772,-2.72091440408539,-2.55226630046971,-2.38425597793465,-2.21787687713447,-2.05656258174384,-1.89889800700337]
Y = 1×19
-4.1384 -4.1046 -4.0565 -3.9962 -3.9234 -3.8339 -3.7358 -3.6174 -3.4940 -3.3523 -3.2055 -3.0489 -2.8866 -2.7209 -2.5523 -2.3843 -2.2179 -2.0566 -1.8989
dX = gradient(X); % Numerical Derivative
dY = gradient(Y); % Numerical Derivative
Len = cumtrapz(X,hypot(dX,dY)) % Integrate The Hypotenuse Of The Numerical Derivatives Of The Segments
Len = 1×19
0 1.2549 2.5102 3.7662 5.0231 6.2812 7.5405 8.8012 10.0634 11.3271 12.5922 13.8584 15.1256 16.3934 17.6616 18.9298 20.1976 21.4648 22.7315
figure
plot(X, Y, '.-')
hold on
plot(X, Len, '.-')
hold off
grid
.
  4 Comments
Star Strider
Star Strider on 26 Aug 2022
I use the gradient function to calculate the derivatives., It produces a different (and in my opinion more accurate) estimate of the derivative than diff (that by definition also results in a vector that is one element shorter than the original), while the length of the gradient result is the same as the original.

Sign in to comment.

More Answers (3)

Ankit
Ankit on 26 Aug 2022
Edited: Ankit on 26 Aug 2022
X=[96.0741000000000,97.1940000000000,98.3139000000000,99.4338000000000,100.553700000000,101.673600000000,102.793500000000,103.913400000000,105.033300000000,106.153200000000,107.273100000000,108.393000000000,109.512900000000,110.632800000000,111.752700000000,112.872600000000,113.992500000000,115.112400000000,116.232300000000];
Y=[-4.13836296940031,-4.10455468315876,-4.05645426203322,-3.99617782198545,-3.92344322326347,-3.83385191481492,-3.73582865974161,-3.61740402741020,-3.49399064332423,-3.35231953224592,-3.20552503148528,-3.04892626846560,-2.88658570885772,-2.72091440408539,-2.55226630046971,-2.38425597793465,-2.21787687713447,-2.05656258174384,-1.89889800700337];
len_curve = sum(vecnorm(diff( [X(:),Y(:)] ),2,2));
% the 2-norm along the rows of a matrix: vecnorm(A,2,2) , where A is a
% vector
% diff: Difference and approximate derivative.
  1 Comment
Volcano
Volcano on 26 Aug 2022
Edited: Volcano on 26 Aug 2022
Thanks a lot, but there is small difference between your answer and other one.

Sign in to comment.


Torsten
Torsten on 26 Aug 2022
Edited: Torsten on 26 Aug 2022
I'd say Ankit's solution is the more intuitive.
But Star Strider's solution should be second-order accurate while Ankit's is only first-order accurate.
X=[96.0741000000000,97.1940000000000,98.3139000000000,99.4338000000000,100.553700000000,101.673600000000,102.793500000000,103.913400000000,105.033300000000,106.153200000000,107.273100000000,108.393000000000,109.512900000000,110.632800000000,111.752700000000,112.872600000000,113.992500000000,115.112400000000,116.232300000000];
Y=[-4.13836296940031,-4.10455468315876,-4.05645426203322,-3.99617782198545,-3.92344322326347,-3.83385191481492,-3.73582865974161,-3.61740402741020,-3.49399064332423,-3.35231953224592,-3.20552503148528,-3.04892626846560,-2.88658570885772,-2.72091440408539,-2.55226630046971,-2.38425597793465,-2.21787687713447,-2.05656258174384,-1.89889800700337];
length = 0;
for i = 1:numel(X)-1
length = length + sqrt((X(i+1)-X(i))^2 + (Y(i+1)-Y(i))^2);
end
length
length = 20.2980

Volcano
Volcano on 26 Aug 2022
Thanks for all answers...

Community Treasure Hunt

Find the treasures in MATLAB Central and discover how the community can help you!

Start Hunting!

Translated by