Video and Webinar Series

Control Systems in Practice

In this series, you’ll learn some of the more practical aspects of being a control systems engineer and designing control systems. The day-to-day role of a control systems engineer is more than just designing a controller and tuning it. Depending on the size and phase of the project, your responsibilities and which groups you work with will probably vary greatly. Designing and testing control systems is still a large portion of the job. This series covers some of the more common control techniques that you’ll encounter as a control systems engineer: gain scheduling and feedforward. Often, the best control system is the simplest and, therefore, the most practical in a wide range of control problems. Gain scheduling, a method that adjusts the gains of simple linear controllers to control nonlinear systems, and feedforward, a method that uses setpoint changes and measured disturbances to limit the feedback error, are two popular and simple techniques for developing practical controllers. Finally, this series also covers time delays in dynamic systems—where they come from and why they matter.  When time delay becomes a problem for your system, minimizing the delay at the source is almost always preferred over developing a clever way for your controller to handle it. It’s easy to assume that a control engineering’s job is to spend months developing a state-of-the-art nonlinear controller. However, there are more practical ways of handling these problems.

Part 1: What Control Systems Engineers Do The work of a control systems engineer involves more than just designing a controller and tuning it. This video provides a picture of the types of things you may be exposed to and the groups with which you might interface while working in this field.

Part 2: What is Gain Scheduling? Often, the best control system is the simplest. This video provides an overview of gain scheduling—a method that adjusts the gains of simple linear controllers to control nonlinear systems.

Part 3: What is Feedforward Control? A control system has two main goals: get the system to track a setpoint, and reject disturbances. Feedback control is pretty powerful for this, but this video shows how feedforward control can supplement feedback to make achieving those goals easier.

Part 4: Why Time Delay Matters Time delays are inherent to dynamic systems and control engineers must understand how to handle them. This video covers time delays, where they come from, and why they matter.